Annual Fiesta celebrated at Elementary

Pinatas+created+by+High+School+students+are+ready+for+the+lottery+at+the+Cinco+de+Mayo+Festival+on+May+6+at+the+Elementary+school
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Annual Fiesta celebrated at Elementary

Pinatas created by High School students are ready for the lottery at the Cinco de Mayo Festival on May 6 at the Elementary school

Pinatas created by High School students are ready for the lottery at the Cinco de Mayo Festival on May 6 at the Elementary school

Ann Hill

Pinatas created by High School students are ready for the lottery at the Cinco de Mayo Festival on May 6 at the Elementary school

Ann Hill

Ann Hill

Pinatas created by High School students are ready for the lottery at the Cinco de Mayo Festival on May 6 at the Elementary school

Ann Hill, for The Tribe

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Morton Elementary held a Cinco de Mayo Fiesta on May 6th in the school cafeteria as a celebration for our ESL students, but also as a community event.

Elementary school parents provided a dinner of enchiladas, rice and beans. Mr. Edward Ramos, Principal Rina Ramos’ husband, and Coach Mark Herrera roasted ears of corn for elotes. Teachers brought cookies, brownies and cakes.

Morton HS students made colorful pinatas that were filled with candy and used as prizes for the Loteria. The children selected their favorites as their families won them. There were many proud winners, children with big smiles posing with their pinatas.

Our Elementary school students celebrated Mexican culture with song and dance. Pre-K classes sang “Los Colores”, a song about colors. The Kindergarten, not to be outdone, performed the Mexican Hat Dance. First grade sang “La Bamba” and Second grade sang and danced to, “It’s Cinco de Mayo Today”.

Ms. Cindy Acevedo gave a brief presentation about the ESL program. She is a parent representative for LPAC. She meets with school committees and advocates for students whose second language is English.

Ms. Acevedo also served as the caller for the Loteria. She didn’t quit until every pinata had found a home.

We had a good program, good food, good entertainment, prizes, and a relaxing family celebration. Perfect!

More on Cinco de Mayo (edited from Wikipedia)

Cinco de Mayo (Spanish for May fifth) is an annual celebration held on May 5. The date is observed to commemorate the Mexican Army’s victory over the French Empire at the Battle of Puebla, on May 5, 1862, under the leadership of General Ignacio Zaragoza. The victory of the smaller Mexican force against a larger French force was a boost to morale for the Mexicans. A year after the battle, a larger French force defeated Zaragoza at the Second Battle of Puebla, and Mexico City soon fell to the invaders.

More popularly celebrated in the United States than Mexico, the date has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. These celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863.

In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with an arts festival, a festival of local cuisine, and re-enactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico’s Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on September 16, commemorating the Cry of Dolores, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain.